Monthly Archives: October 2010

Sept. 3, 1942: Workwear Don’ts, WW II-Style

WWD warned readers to watch out for “Sweater Sue” and “Glittering Gertie.”

Sept. 3, 1942: Workwear Don’ts, WW II-Style

WWD warned readers to watch out for “Sweater Sue” and “Glittering Gertie.”

Spring 2011 Accessories Trend: Prairie Fire

Natural skins, artisanal details and, of course, a little gingham dance their way onto accessories for spring.

Spring 2011 Accessories Trend: Prairie Fire

Natural skins, artisanal details and, of course, a little gingham dance their way onto accessories for spring.

The Brilliantly Uncool Alber Elbaz

Alber Elbaz says, “I’m not an image-maker; I’m a dressmaker.”

The Brilliantly Uncool Alber Elbaz

Alber Elbaz says, “I’m not an image-maker; I’m a dressmaker.”

Marc Jacobs Designs Bloomie’s Shopping Bag… Flash Fashion…

Along with all the renovations, beauty installations and designer shops added in the past years, there’s another new look at Bloomingdale’s.

Marc Jacobs Designs Bloomie’s Shopping Bag… Flash Fashion…

Along with all the renovations, beauty installations and designer shops added in the past years, there’s another new look at Bloomingdale’s.

Lanvin-apalooza

The Lanvin store on Madison Avenue has been open since July, but the French fashion house didn’t really pop the cork until Friday night, when Alber Elbaz threw a Halloween Extravaganza that had all three floors packed with costumed revelers. Not surprisingly, ghosts and witches took a backseat to Lagerfeld and Galliano lookalikes—Elbaz himself even had a bespectacled doppelgänger. Other outfits had more esoteric origins. Editor Mickey Boardman explained that his bespoke bat-eared lace headpiece was “influenced by Queen Victoria’s oldest daughter, and by a picture of Isabella Blow wearing a mask by Philip Treacy.” That’s one way to avoid the line at Ricky’s.

Boardman’s colleagues at Paper magazine’s party division created the festive surroundings: The path upstairs was strewn with confetti and multicolored balloons, waiters distributed macarons and cotton candy, and Silly String and charming masks made from Elbaz’s sketches were among the party favors. “Fashion’s fun, isn’t it? I feel like I’m in a fluorescent Champagne bubble,” said Anne Hathaway, who wore a leopard-print Lanvin jumper and managed to stay somewhat anonymous behind a long-nosed Venetian mask. Meanwhile, drag queens vamped about as Dolly Parton and Tina Turner on a stage designed to look like a giant Lanvin dress box.

But that was no Janet Jackson impersonator on the third floor with Elbaz—it was the real thing. As ever, the designer was quick to put the spotlight on others. “I worked with Geoffrey Beene for eight years and Halloween was his favorite holiday, so I’m kind of thinking about him tonight,” Elbaz said. “I think the last time I put on a costume, I was 10 years old. I usually dress other people.”

—Darrell Hartman

Fright Night

With its unerring instinct for turning every event, from fashion week to Miami’s Art Basel, into a series of parties, the style set has officially appropriated Halloween. Where once there might have been two or maybe three big dos, the whole weekend is now a nonstop marathon of costume changes and cocktail inhalation. Following Friday night’s Lanvin hullabaloo, Saturday was loaded with at least half a dozen competing bashes.

What’s one way to avoid the Manhattan madness? If you’re Visionaire, bring everyone out to Queens. Cecilia Dean and co. held a celebration at MoMA PS1 for their upcoming issue about children’s tales. The magazine had also helped organize Move, the weekend-long art-and-fashion happening at the museum, so this was an after-party of sorts. Standing by himself early on, Klaus Biesenbach, in authentic getup, including the walkie-talkie, made a quite convincing security guard; later, he fell into his usual role as the museum’s very sociable director.

Meanwhile, over the river and through the wilds of the Meatpacking District’s jammed streets, Purple magazine was throwing an epic Heaven or Hell bash at the Standard, where saints (arguable) and sinners moved between the shadowy haze of Le Bain and the lighter, more comfortable (in theory, at least) environs of the aerie formerly known as the Boom Boom Room. The hotel’s owner, André Balazs, was wearing priest’s garb and stationed in the carpeted purgatory between the two nightspots. “It’s the right mixture,” he decided, even if all the angel wings were making it a bit hard to get around.

Nearby, at The Smile’s Jane hotel party, Carlos Quirarte and Matt Kliegman, who hosted with Nate Lowman, drew a crowd that included Mary-Kate Olsen (dressed as a bunny), Will Arnett, and Justin Theroux, one of the judges of the evening’s costume contest. Amid the more attention-seeking creations, no one paid much heed to a tiny girl in a gorgeous, floor-length red gown and Kewpie doll mask. Well, even Ashley Olsen deserves a night off now and again.

Glancing at the crowd assembled for his Misfits Ball at Don Hill’s, a be-horned Nur Khan said, “Man, I have no idea who’s here tonight. It’s impossible to tell, with the costumes.” Over there—a seventeenth-century English aristocrat, dancing with Flavor Flav. That way, a corpse bride chatting with a guy in a kilt. In the corner, was that John Mayer? (It was.) Trick or treat?

—Darrell Hartman (Visionaire and Purple), Matthew Schneier (The Smile), and Maya Singer (Don Hill’s)